Using AutoCrat in the Classroom

At a training I attended a couple of months ago, I was shown how to use the add-on autoCrat for Google Sheets. It takes information from a Google Sheet and disseminates it into specified places on a Google Doc based on a template that includes <<merge tags>>. Once in the Doc, it can be emailed automatically to specific email addresses as a Doc or PDF, shared with specific people, or just kept in your Google Drive.

The possibilities are endless for how to use this, but here are a few ideas. Feel free to check out my AutoCrat Ideas folder in Google Drive. All of the files there are set up for you to have viewing access, but File>Make a copy will add a copy of it to your drive to edit for your own use.

  • At Meet the Teacher night, instead of trying to read information scrawled on the papers you left around the room, have parents completed a Google Form. From there, use an autocrat job to: send a personalized welcome email, and populate a student information sheet that you can print for your sub folder and teacher planner.
  • Alice Keeler had the brilliant idea to use AutoCrat to create personalized newsletters for each student. I have a sample in my folder. My sample was made very lazily, so there are options such as, “Student is doing social studies,” but it’s enough to give you the idea of how it works. For the newsletter, I have mine set up to not run the AutoCrat job until I manually go to the spreadsheet and push the run button. That way, no one gets their newsletter until I’m ready to send it to everyone. I made a Google Form for it, but some sections will be the same for every student (although, not for every newsletter), such as general information and important dates. I plan on completing that part of the form for the first student, then copying and pasting for the rest of the class in the spreadsheet. Another alternative would be to update the template before running the AutoCrat job for each edition of the newsletter, and just eliminating that question from the Form.
  • Filling out award certificates.
  • Sending emails to parents to inform them about an event regarding their child (positive message, missing work, etc.)
  • Sharing the questions and a student’s answers to a Google Forms quiz with their family in a neat document.
  • Awarding badges or certificates for completing specific tasks.

Do you already use autoCrat in your classroom? What are some other ideas you have for how to use it to make your life easier?

 

How 1:1 Technology Changed My Classroom

This year, I was fortunate enough for my district to provide every student in my grade level a Chromebook that they could access throughout their school day.

First quarter, there were some hiccups. Not every student was allowed access for several weeks, as each student and their family attended the training regarding the expectations and acceptable usage of these devices, as well as the consequences for noncompliance. (Our technology lab is entirely comprised of Chromebooks, so students were already proficient on how to operate them.) Between this and all of the normal first quarter hullabaloo, I hardly used our Chromebooks, and I felt really guilty about it.

Around the beginning of second quarter, when things in the school year get a little less crazy, I began having students use their Chromebooks for pretty much everything. This was over the top, and not exactly best practices either.

For the remainder of the year, I’ve made it a point to strike a better balance, although it is still my preference for graded work to be turned in online, especially for tasks the take more than one class period.

Some of the benefits I’ve found of having 1:1 access to technology are:

  • Instant feedback for students – Whether students complete a self-checking quiz on Canvas/Google Forms, or work on a website that gives immediate feedback, students are able to realize their errors and correct their far more quickly than if they completed a worksheet and wait until I get around to grading it and hand them back.
  • Differentiation – A Google Forms quiz can be set up for students to be sent to a particular section depending upon how previous questions are answered, Canvas modules can be set up as Mastery Paths to give students “just right” work depending on their performance on the initial assignment. Obviously you don’t need technology to differentiate, but setting it up to run automatically is definitely a time-saver during implementation. I also like that it’s a little less obvious to students who is getting the easier work than it is when everyone has their paper on the table.
  • Save paper and copies – I have definitely used less paper than last year, and spent much less time standing at the copier waiting for it to print out the work for my class.
  • No lost papers – When you use less paper, there are fewer papers that can be misplaced! There is not a concern about whether you remembered to give a copy to the student who was absent the day a task was assigned, no making sure that you put that late paper in the same stack as the rest of the work from that task, and no one needing a second copy because they accidentally forgot their backpack at home that day. Students who are absent, sometimes return to school with the work they were absent for already completed. There is never a question about whether a student really did turn in an assignment, and work that has been turned in is marked with a time-stamp so you know exactly when it was submitted.
  • Paper planners are no longer the only way to keep track of assignments. – While some people function better with the paper planner, having work posted in Google Classroom or Canvas helps to keep track of assignments. You might only use it as a backup plan when the planner is forgotten, or as another layer of communication to keep families connected with what work students are doing in the classroom. Both Google Classroom and Canvas have a calendar function that show the due date for assignments. In addition to the calendar function, I have set up my Canvas classroom so that the landing page includes an embedded Google Slides file showing students what they need to work on that day, what work they can do to get ahead, and what students may do to keep learning when they have already completed all of the currently assigned work. I update that slideshow every morning before my class arrives so that I don’t need to embed new files each day.