Create Fluid Quizzes on Canvas

Do you have access to Canvas? There are some amazing features, aren’t there? So many, that it can be a bit overwhelming. The other side of that is the temptation to keep everything extremely basic, but that means you aren’t taking advantage of all of the bells and whistles at your disposal.

Why might fluid quizzes be helpful to you?

Do you:

  • teach multiple sections of the same class?
  • have students show mastery as they are ready, rather than all on the same day?
  • allow students multiple opportunities to show mastery?
  • want to safeguard against potential cheating?

If you answered yes to any of the above, fluid quizzes are for you.

What are fluid quizzes?

They are online quizzes that change within the parameters you have set so it is different each time it loads. Students are not guaranteed to have any of the same questions as their friends, and even if their question is the same, the order of the answer choices are scrambled.

How Do I Create a Fluid Quiz?

When you first create your quiz, scroll down on the details tab and check the box for “Shuffle Answers.” I also like to let students see their correct answers at a certain date, my standard is to make their answers visible the day after the quiz closes for submissions. You can also click “Allow Multiple Attempts.” Each attempt will potentially load different questions, and answer choices for questions that were on the original quiz will be shuffled.

detail options

Now it’s time to add the questions. Go to the “Questions” tab. Choose “New Question Group.”

new question group button

Click “Link to a Question Bank.” If you have made quizzes before, but not played with question banks, you probably have a whole lot of unfiled questions.

link to question bank

If you already have a question bank ready to go that only includes questions you would be happy to have on this quiz, select that title and click “Select Banks” at the bottom of the pop up window. If not, choose “View Course Question Banks.”

question bank list

On the far left, choose the button “Add Question Bank.” Give it a title and press enter.

add question banks

If you have questions you have used before that you would like to add to this question bank, open the “Unfiled questions” bank. If you have just one or two questions you want to move, you can just click “move/copy question to another bank” for those particular questions.

move question

If you have a lot of questions you want to move, you’re better off using the “Move Multiple Questions” tool on the far right.

move multiple questions

Clicking this will open a pop up window that lets you quickly click check boxes for all the questions you want to move, and send them all to the same question bank. You can send them to an existing bank, or create a new one right there.

move questions pop up

Keep in mind that you need to have more questions in your question bank than you intend to include on your quiz. The closer the number of questions are in your bank to the number of questions you plan to include on the quiz, the higher the probability that students will have the same question on their quizzes. I like to keep the number of questions in my bank at about double what I plan to include on my quiz.

To add questions, go to the question bank you want to edit, and click “Add question” on the right hand side. Edit your question bank until you are satisfied with it. If you work with a team, perhaps each person could be a teacher in a shared sandbox, and you can all contribute a certain number of questions to each question bank.

One word of caution

You want all of the questions in a question bank to be of a similar difficulty level. If your bank of questions has a range of skill levels, it is entirely possible that some students will luck out with all easy questions, some will have a mixture, and others will have all difficult questions. If you have a range of difficulty levels for questions on the same skill, you can make a different question bank for each level, and are able to allot more points to the more difficult questions if you want.

add a question

You can also include multiple question banks on the same quiz. For instance, I created a fluid quiz on rounding that includes 3 questions on rounding to the nearest ten, 3 questions on rounding to the nearest hundred, 1 question rounding to the nearest dollar, and 1 vocabulary question. I have four different question banks for that quiz.

multiple question banks

This quiz will load 8 questions for each student. I have 6 questions in the Round to the Nearest Ten bank, 1 question in the Round to the Nearest Dollar bank, 6 questions in the Round to the Nearest Hundred bank, and 2 questions in the Rounding Vocabulary bank. I know everyone will get the same question for rounding to the nearest dollar, and there is a 50/50 chance of students having the same question regarding vocabulary. The actual rounding practice questions will be fairly varied, so I’m happy with it as it is.

Results

I previewed the quiz and this is what loaded for the first 3 questions.

first two questions

When I closed the quiz and made no other changes except pressing the preview button again, this is what loaded for the first 3 questions.

first two questions - second try

Out of the 3 questions that loaded for each time I previewed quiz, there was only one repeat, and the order of the answers was scrambled. This means that even if a student has multiple attempts on the quiz, they are likely to get different questions for most of the quiz on their subsequent attempts than they did on their first.

Can I Do This On Google?

As far as I know, there isn’t a way to do something quite like this on Google Forms at this point. You can scramble the answer choices, and even scramble the order of the questions, but there isn’t a question bank feature. You can have the form set up to move to specific pages based on how certain questions are answered, which has its own benefits. For example, you can use a Google Form quiz to send students to easier or harder questions as they answer each question correctly or incorrectly. I can see that being really helpful when you give a pretest. It would allow you to find the upper limits of your students who are already knowledgeable on that topic without frustrating your students who have less prior knowledge.

 

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How 1:1 Technology Changed My Classroom

This year, I was fortunate enough for my district to provide every student in my grade level a Chromebook that they could access throughout their school day.

First quarter, there were some hiccups. Not every student was allowed access for several weeks, as each student and their family attended the training regarding the expectations and acceptable usage of these devices, as well as the consequences for noncompliance. (Our technology lab is entirely comprised of Chromebooks, so students were already proficient on how to operate them.) Between this and all of the normal first quarter hullabaloo, I hardly used our Chromebooks, and I felt really guilty about it.

Around the beginning of second quarter, when things in the school year get a little less crazy, I began having students use their Chromebooks for pretty much everything. This was over the top, and not exactly best practices either.

For the remainder of the year, I’ve made it a point to strike a better balance, although it is still my preference for graded work to be turned in online, especially for tasks the take more than one class period.

Some of the benefits I’ve found of having 1:1 access to technology are:

  • Instant feedback for students – Whether students complete a self-checking quiz on Canvas/Google Forms, or work on a website that gives immediate feedback, students are able to realize their errors and correct their far more quickly than if they completed a worksheet and wait until I get around to grading it and hand them back.
  • Differentiation – A Google Forms quiz can be set up for students to be sent to a particular section depending upon how previous questions are answered, Canvas modules can be set up as Mastery Paths to give students “just right” work depending on their performance on the initial assignment. Obviously you don’t need technology to differentiate, but setting it up to run automatically is definitely a time-saver during implementation. I also like that it’s a little less obvious to students who is getting the easier work than it is when everyone has their paper on the table.
  • Save paper and copies – I have definitely used less paper than last year, and spent much less time standing at the copier waiting for it to print out the work for my class.
  • No lost papers – When you use less paper, there are fewer papers that can be misplaced! There is not a concern about whether you remembered to give a copy to the student who was absent the day a task was assigned, no making sure that you put that late paper in the same stack as the rest of the work from that task, and no one needing a second copy because they accidentally forgot their backpack at home that day. Students who are absent, sometimes return to school with the work they were absent for already completed. There is never a question about whether a student really did turn in an assignment, and work that has been turned in is marked with a time-stamp so you know exactly when it was submitted.
  • Paper planners are no longer the only way to keep track of assignments. – While some people function better with the paper planner, having work posted in Google Classroom or Canvas helps to keep track of assignments. You might only use it as a backup plan when the planner is forgotten, or as another layer of communication to keep families connected with what work students are doing in the classroom. Both Google Classroom and Canvas have a calendar function that show the due date for assignments. In addition to the calendar function, I have set up my Canvas classroom so that the landing page includes an embedded Google Slides file showing students what they need to work on that day, what work they can do to get ahead, and what students may do to keep learning when they have already completed all of the currently assigned work. I update that slideshow every morning before my class arrives so that I don’t need to embed new files each day.

Playlists and Pathways: What Are They?

The short answer is, playlists and pathways are the road map to your personalized learning unit for you and your students.

A playlist is a single-track path of activities that students will complete, in the order they are written. Based on information such as pretests, students may start at different points of the pathway, but the pathway for that skill or unit has all of the same activities and assignments on it for each student.

A pathway is much like a playlist, but it offers students choice. Instead of one activity or assignment that the student must do, they have 2 or 3 options of which task(s) to complete for that portion of the pathway. Just like with a playlist, the starting point for each student may depend upon information from a pretest or other data. Again, there is a progressive order in which the tasks must be completed, but the options can help to keep students engaged and interested. Sometimes the options are sorted by multiple intelligences, learning styles, levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy, or even the difficulty level of the material (below, at, and above grade level).

4.OA.14.OA.24.OA.34.OA.44.OA.5Pathway

NFPathway1

Both linked files are written as pathways, which means that they offer at least some level of student choice. To turn them  into playlists, all that would have to change is that students would be required to complete all activities in order, or you would remove some of the activities and students would be required to complete each task in order.

If your district uses Canvas as an LMS, there is a feature that allows you to use tasks and pages on Canvas as you would a playlist or pathway. To use it, you need to go to your settings and click the slider bar for mastery paths to green. On a graded task (teacher graded or automatically scored) that has been assigned to everyone, go to the Mastery Paths tab to choose which task(s) students complete next depending upon how they score on that assignment. If you assign multiple tasks for a score range, the default is for students to do both tasks, making it a playlist. When you are setting it up, you can click the “&” between tasks to change it to “or,” which allows students to choose one of the two (or more) tasks you have attached to that scoring range. This subtle detail effectively changes your playlist to a pathway.

I’m using a Mastery Path module in Canvas LMS for my students as we are reviewing for our end of year standardized testing. For each specific standard, I have a pretest in Canvas. Depending upon how they score on that pretest, they are either directed to another pretest, or to a page with review instruction on the skill and short quiz to practice. Students who do not show mastery on either quiz will be pulled for small group instruction and practice, then given another chance on the quiz. This allows students who have mastered the skills move on instead of sitting in on yet another review session for something they can already do proficiently, and lets those who need more instruction and practice have that in a smaller setting.