Teachers Using Google Apps Scripts

The training I’ve been to (so far) this summer where I’ve learned the most was one on using Google Apps Scripts. There was a pretest, which I completely bombed, and I wondered whether I was in so far over my head that I should just go home. It was very much out of my comfort zone, as the most sophisticated programming I’ve done before was Lego NXT robots with drag and drop programming, when I taught summer camps at the local science museum.

Why should a teacher learn to code Google Apps Scripts? Well, if you have repetitive tasks you do on any Google products (within the same product or moving information from one to another, such as from a spreadsheet to a document), creating a script to complete that task at the touch of a button (or automatically at a specific time) could be a real time-saver! It may take awhile to code the script in the beginning, but once you have it, it saves a ton of time later. If you’ve never coded before, the learning curve is a bit steep, but there are resources free on the internet to help you!

Helpful Resources

Codecademy – Use the JavaScript tutorial. Google Apps Scripts is sort of like a dialect of JavaScript. If you get the basics from this, you’ll have a good foundation.

Google Apps Scripts Developers Page – You can click on the product you’re coding a script to use with, or use the guides near the top to help learn how to use the apps scripts for different purposes. I recommend using CRTL+F in order to search for specific terms on the page.

Alice Keeler – One of the things that really helped me to make some of my scripts work was to look at one that is functional, and tweak it to do what I want that may differ just a little from that initial author’s intention. Alice Keeler has a ton of premade scripts and add-ons that she shares on her website for free. She also has tutorials for writing your own.

Example Scripts

To run a script:

  1. Open the file the script is attached to.
  2. Go to Tools>Script Editor
  3. Choose the script you want to run (if more than one) and press the play button OR click Run>Name of the script. All of the scripts below will only work on the tab of the spreadsheet you are currently open to.

Format a Spreadsheet – This will format a spreadsheet to get it ready to analyze data. It changes the column widths, deletes extra columns and rows, freezes the first column and the first two rows, changes the color of the background and font of the header rows, and set up to average the columns. To use it, open the file, then go to File>Make a copy. The copy is yours to edit and use as needed. Feel free to copy my script and change it for your needs.

Words Their Way Spelling Inventories – Semi-Automatic Analysis

I made a file for each version of the WTW spelling inventories. I call them semi-automatic analysis is that it doesn’t analyze correctly spelled features for incorrectly spelled words. If you type in how each student spelled each word, the script will mark the word as spelled correctly or incorrectly, and will give feature points for all correctly spelled words. You will still need to manually score feature points for words that have been misspelled. You’ll also need to transfer the data from each student’s tab to the class scoresheet. Once there, it will automatically color code each spelling feature as mastery or “could benefit from instruction” based on the recommendations from the Words Their Way book. I have the fourth edition of the book, so please double check whether there are huge changes that need to be accounted for before using my files as they are. I hope to update the code (once I figure out how to do it) to automatically transfer information from each tab to the class scoresheet, so keep a lookout for updates if you’re interested in using these. These files would be great to use with Alice Keeler’s TemplateTab script! Just make sure you run her script first.

You’ll need to use the link below for the file(s) you need, then File>Make a copy in order to actually use them. I have instructions for using the script on the first tab of each file to help you out.

Primary Spelling Inventory

Elementary Spelling Inventory

Upper Level Spelling Inventory

 

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Growth Mindset and Always Learning

If you read so much as the title of my blog, you probably know I’m an educator, but I’m also a parent to 3 boys (all age 9 and under). Not long before the school year ended for my sons, we sat down and made some goals for the summer, because when you have a lot of time on your hands, it is sadly really easy to let it all slip away. Before we realize what has happened, it will be late July and we will have accomplished nothing more scintillating than watching a whole lot of Netflix if we don’t form some semblance of a plan.

They chose their own goals, but I gave them some suggestions. Some goals are things like working on belt loops for Cub Scouts, going to the local science museum and zoo, swimming, and reading a book now and again.

One of the things I know they need to work on is their fine motor skills and handwriting. While some kids may get really excited about practicing forming row after row of individual letters and contrived words, mine simply don’t. I knew that printing handwriting pages off the internet would only end in tears (more than likely mine). Instead, we have implemented Family Art Time. Each night one of us chooses a YouTube video that features “how to” step by step instructions for drawing a fairly simple picture, and all of us attempt to draw it…even the grown-ups. For now, we’ve been choosing from kidsarthub’s channel, but their last video was uploaded 2 years ago, so I know we’ll need to find another at some point. We each have our own little blank notebook to use as a sketchbook, and I hope that they realize at the end of the summer how much their drawing improves over time. We might even revisit some of our early videos in August to see how much better we are at drawing something familiar after so much practice.
We’re still very early in the summer, but so far the results are good. The boys are excited about family art time, they work to control their pencils carefully to create what the video shows, all of us are improving our drawing skills, and we’re spending time together as a family.

One of the things I love about Family Art Time is that it has given us a natural situation to nurture a growth mindset in our boys. They see Mom and Dad erasing when we make mistakes. We have already had one kid remark in frustration that he just isn’t very good at drawing the picture du jour, which led us into a conversation about how practicing is the best way to get better at things.

Want to follow my journey as an artist? I’ve been documenting it on Instagram @thecurriculumnerd.