Create Fluid Quizzes on Canvas

Do you have access to Canvas? There are some amazing features, aren’t there? So many, that it can be a bit overwhelming. The other side of that is the temptation to keep everything extremely basic, but that means you aren’t taking advantage of all of the bells and whistles at your disposal.

Why might fluid quizzes be helpful to you?

Do you:

  • teach multiple sections of the same class?
  • have students show mastery as they are ready, rather than all on the same day?
  • allow students multiple opportunities to show mastery?
  • want to safeguard against potential cheating?

If you answered yes to any of the above, fluid quizzes are for you.

What are fluid quizzes?

They are online quizzes that change within the parameters you have set so it is different each time it loads. Students are not guaranteed to have any of the same questions as their friends, and even if their question is the same, the order of the answer choices are scrambled.

How Do I Create a Fluid Quiz?

When you first create your quiz, scroll down on the details tab and check the box for “Shuffle Answers.” I also like to let students see their correct answers at a certain date, my standard is to make their answers visible the day after the quiz closes for submissions. You can also click “Allow Multiple Attempts.” Each attempt will potentially load different questions, and answer choices for questions that were on the original quiz will be shuffled.

detail options

Now it’s time to add the questions. Go to the “Questions” tab. Choose “New Question Group.”

new question group button

Click “Link to a Question Bank.” If you have made quizzes before, but not played with question banks, you probably have a whole lot of unfiled questions.

link to question bank

If you already have a question bank ready to go that only includes questions you would be happy to have on this quiz, select that title and click “Select Banks” at the bottom of the pop up window. If not, choose “View Course Question Banks.”

question bank list

On the far left, choose the button “Add Question Bank.” Give it a title and press enter.

add question banks

If you have questions you have used before that you would like to add to this question bank, open the “Unfiled questions” bank. If you have just one or two questions you want to move, you can just click “move/copy question to another bank” for those particular questions.

move question

If you have a lot of questions you want to move, you’re better off using the “Move Multiple Questions” tool on the far right.

move multiple questions

Clicking this will open a pop up window that lets you quickly click check boxes for all the questions you want to move, and send them all to the same question bank. You can send them to an existing bank, or create a new one right there.

move questions pop up

Keep in mind that you need to have more questions in your question bank than you intend to include on your quiz. The closer the number of questions are in your bank to the number of questions you plan to include on the quiz, the higher the probability that students will have the same question on their quizzes. I like to keep the number of questions in my bank at about double what I plan to include on my quiz.

To add questions, go to the question bank you want to edit, and click “Add question” on the right hand side. Edit your question bank until you are satisfied with it. If you work with a team, perhaps each person could be a teacher in a shared sandbox, and you can all contribute a certain number of questions to each question bank.

One word of caution

You want all of the questions in a question bank to be of a similar difficulty level. If your bank of questions has a range of skill levels, it is entirely possible that some students will luck out with all easy questions, some will have a mixture, and others will have all difficult questions. If you have a range of difficulty levels for questions on the same skill, you can make a different question bank for each level, and are able to allot more points to the more difficult questions if you want.

add a question

You can also include multiple question banks on the same quiz. For instance, I created a fluid quiz on rounding that includes 3 questions on rounding to the nearest ten, 3 questions on rounding to the nearest hundred, 1 question rounding to the nearest dollar, and 1 vocabulary question. I have four different question banks for that quiz.

multiple question banks

This quiz will load 8 questions for each student. I have 6 questions in the Round to the Nearest Ten bank, 1 question in the Round to the Nearest Dollar bank, 6 questions in the Round to the Nearest Hundred bank, and 2 questions in the Rounding Vocabulary bank. I know everyone will get the same question for rounding to the nearest dollar, and there is a 50/50 chance of students having the same question regarding vocabulary. The actual rounding practice questions will be fairly varied, so I’m happy with it as it is.

Results

I previewed the quiz and this is what loaded for the first 3 questions.

first two questions

When I closed the quiz and made no other changes except pressing the preview button again, this is what loaded for the first 3 questions.

first two questions - second try

Out of the 3 questions that loaded for each time I previewed quiz, there was only one repeat, and the order of the answers was scrambled. This means that even if a student has multiple attempts on the quiz, they are likely to get different questions for most of the quiz on their subsequent attempts than they did on their first.

Can I Do This On Google?

As far as I know, there isn’t a way to do something quite like this on Google Forms at this point. You can scramble the answer choices, and even scramble the order of the questions, but there isn’t a question bank feature. You can have the form set up to move to specific pages based on how certain questions are answered, which has its own benefits. For example, you can use a Google Form quiz to send students to easier or harder questions as they answer each question correctly or incorrectly. I can see that being really helpful when you give a pretest. It would allow you to find the upper limits of your students who are already knowledgeable on that topic without frustrating your students who have less prior knowledge.

 

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